Not much of a story for how I know about this one. I’ve seen the trailer maybe once, and the movie’s cast alone has me hooked. It’s based on a book of the same name, a memoir to be precise. It looks like it’s about this young, upscale woman with a serious stick up her ass and reflects on her childhood living on the move with her family, but eventually leaves them behind and makes her own way and holds some sort of grudge against her father, specifically. I think I have this story pegged, but it could be good.

Here’s the cast. Starring, we have Brie Larson (KONG: SKULL ISLAND [2017], ROOM [2015], 21 JUMP STREET [2012], and Marvel’s upcoming CAPTAIN MARVEL [2019]) and Woody Harrelson (WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES [2017], THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN [2016], NATURAL BORN KILLERS [1994], and the upcoming SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY [2018]). In support, we have Naomi Watts (THE BOOK OF HENRY [2017], DEMOLITION [2016], KING KONG [2005], and the upcoming straight-to-TV Divergent conclusion ASCENDANT, no release date announced) and Max Greenfield (ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE [2016], HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS [2016], and TV show NEW GIRL [2011 – ongoing]).

Now for the crew. Directing and co-writing is Destin Daniel Cretton, known for a bunch of short films. Cretton’s partner-in-pen is Andrew Lanham, known for THE SHACK (2017). Composing the score is Joel P. West, known for GRANDMA (2015). Finally, the cinematographer is Brett Pawlak, known for MAX STEEL (2016), THE MEDDLER (2016), and TV show HALO 4: FORWARD UNTO DAWN (2012).

Overall, I’m pretty excited for this, but I’m pretty bias toward the cast.

This is my honest opinion of: THE GLASS CASTLE

(SUMMARY)

Based on true events, set in 1989. Jeanette (Brie Larson) is an accomplished and talented writer, happily about to get married to her fiancé David (Max Greenfield). However, her life wasn’t so glitzy and glamorous because as a child, she grew up with her siblings in a harsh environment. Though their father Rex (Woody Harrelson) was a loving and well-meaning dad and husband to his wife Rose Mary (Naomi Watts), he was also a drunk, had a great capacity for cruelty. As an adult, her relationship with her parents is complex and uncertain as she struggles with accepting her family into the life she’s built for herself.

(QUICK REVIEW)

I really liked this movie.

First and foremost, Larson brings her A-game, as per usual. She’s a woman trying to come to grips with her family and how different they are from her, and just how much she herself evolved from when she was a child. A kid growing up with imagination and an enthusiasm for the future, but also never staying in one place and always finding ways to take care of her drunken father. Even the younger versions of Jeanette, young Ella Anderson and younger Chandler Head do fantastic jobs at showing love toward and fear of their father over the years. Harrelson also once again proves his gravity on screen as we see a complicated man who loves his family, but seems to love making promises that he’ll never be able to keep. He’s always on the move, refusing to conform to society’s rules and wants to blaze his own trails. When he’s sober, he’s loving, playful, and full of bizarre-yet-sensible wisdom. When he’s drunk, he’s careless, destructive, abusive, even violent. Even when his children want him to stop drinking, he’ll put himself through the grind to better himself. But when he does, he isn’t sober long before something pushes him back over that ledge. Again, I’m nominating Harrelson as a national treasure.

The story does remind me a little bit of CAPTAIN FANTASTIC (2016), in the respect of a father who tries to take care of his family without doing it by the rules of what is considered “normal,” so there is a lot of bias that I have toward this film for its bold statements. Beyond that, I do love how this film does explores the complexities of generational gaps of thinking and ways of life, the difference between imparting wisdom and intelligence and the consequences of not knowing the difference. It’s a very fascinating film full of emotion, subtle and not-so-subtle intensity. Sure, there’s a few moments that seem a little too far-fetched to be taken seriously, but this movie is very good and I highly recommend it.

My honest rating for THE GLASS CASTLE: a strong 4/5

glass_castle_xlg

5 Replies to “THE GLASS CASTLE (quick) review”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: